Saturday, December 20, 2014

Truth about War in Korea 1950 - 1953

BBC Documentary - Kill Them All - The American Military in Korea
The Korean War was a bloody conflict. It left Korea, North and South, with several million dead and the UN forces involved in the fighting with over 100,000 casualties. But despite fighting as intense and as violent as any other conflict since World War Two, Korea has always been history's 'Forgotten War'.

While atrocities conducted both by North and South Korean forces have already been documented, recently a much darker side to the US involvement in the Korean War has begun to emerge. It casts a shadow over the conduct of US forces during the conflict, particularly of officers and generals in command. Declassified military documents recently found in the US National Archives show clearly how US commanders repeatedly, and without ambiguity, ordered forces under their control to target and kill Korean refugees caught on the battlefield. More disturbing still have been the published testimonies of Korean survivors who recall such killings, and the frank accounts of those American veterans brave enough to admit involvement.

The Korean War began on 25 June 1950 when communist North Korea invaded the South with six army divisions. These North Korean forces, backed by impressive Soviet equipment including tanks, made quick gains into the territory. The United States decided to intervene in the defence of the South and, taking advantage of the Soviet absence from the UN Security Council, proceeded to press for UN resolutions condemning the invasion. Days later a resolution was passed calling upon member countries to give assistance to South Korea to repulse the attack. General Douglas MacArthur, then in charge of US forces in the Pacific and of the occupation of Japan, was appointed commander of the joint forces.

BBC Documentary - Kill Them All

Korean War - Documentary Film 1950 - 1953
Korean War in Color documents war-torn Korea the way the soldiers saw it-in full, shocking color. This digitally mastered DVD presents a true picture of war-full of terror, chaos, blood and courage. Many of the images included here have never been seen by the general public before, having been kept top secret for decades by military officials for fear of a public backlash.

Here are just a few of the color highlights: M.A.S.H. units in action-no Hawkeye, B.J., radar or Klinger here-these are the real men and women who saved thousands of lives. Also, the daring Inchon invasion, the battle of Seol, the Naktong River campaign, winter along the Chosin Reservoir, War in the Skies, and legendary director John Ford s rare footage of the 1st Marine
Division in Action.

In April 1950 Kim Il-sung travelled to Moscow and secured Stalin's support for a policy to unify Korea under his authority. Although agreeing with the invasion of South Korea in principle, Stalin refused to become directly involved in Kim's plans, and advised Kim to enlist Chinese support instead. In May 1950 Kim visited Beijing, and succeeded in gaining Mao's endorsement. At the time, Mao's support for Kim was largely political (he was contemplating the invasions of Taiwan and Tibet), and was unaware of Kim's precise intentions or the timing of Kim's attack. When the Korean war broke out, the Chinese were in the process of demobilizing half of the PLA's 5.6 million soldiers Stalin created "detailed [war] plans" that were communicated to the North Koreans.

On 7 June 1950, Kim Il-sung called for an election in whole Korea on 5--8 August 1950 and a consultative conference in Haeju on 15--17 June 1950. On 11 June, the North sent three diplomats to the South, who were later arrested by the South. Fourteen days later on 25 June 1950, the North Korean People's Army (KPA) crossed the 38th parallel border and invaded South Korea.

Korean War- Documentary Film 1950-1953

No comments: