Saturday, November 26, 2011

Truth about Bisphenol A (BPA) in Plastic and Can Products

Bisphenol A (BPA) is an organic compound with two phenol functional groups. It is used to make polycarbonate plastic and epoxy resins, along with other applications.

Known to be estrogenic since the mid 1930s, concerns about the use of bisphenol A in consumer products were regularly reported in the news media in 2008 after several governments issued reports questioning its safety, prompting some retailers to remove products containing it from their shelves. A 2010 report from the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) raised further concerns regarding exposure of fetuses, infants and young children. In September 2010, Canada became the first country to declare BPA as a toxic substance. In the European Union and Canada, BPA use is banned in baby bottles.

"In general, plastics that are marked with recycle codes 1, 2, 4, 5, and 6 are very unlikely to contain BPA. Some, but not all, plastics that are marked with recycle codes 3 or 7 may be made with BPA."

There are seven classes of plastics used in packaging applications. Type 7 is the catch-all "other" class, and some type 7 plastics, such as polycarbonate (sometimes identified with the letters "PC" near the recycling symbol) and epoxy resins, are made from bisphenol A monomer.

Type 3 (PVC) can also contain bisphenol A as an antioxidant in plasticizers. This is particularly true for "flexible PVC", but not true for PVC pipes.

Environmental risk
In general, studies have shown that BPA can affect growth, reproduction and development in aquatic organisms. Among freshwater organisms, fish appear to be the most sensitive species. Evidence of endocrine-related effects in fish, aquatic invertebrates, amphibians and reptiles has been reported at environmentally relevant exposure levels lower than those required for acute toxicity. There is a widespread variation in reported values for endocrine-related effects, but many fall in the range of 1μg/L to 1 mg/L.

BPA can contaminate the environment either directly or through degradation of products containing BPA, such as ocean-borne plastic trash.

As an environmental contaminant this compound interferes with nitrogen fixation at the roots of leguminous plants associated with the bacterial symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti. Despite a half-life in the soil of only 1–10 days, its ubiquity makes it an important pollutant. According to Environment Canada, "initial assessment shows that at low levels, bisphenol A can harm fish and organisms over time. Studies also indicate that it can currently be found in municipal wastewater."

A 2009 review of the biological impacts of plasticizers on wildlife published by the Royal Society with a focus on annelids (both aquatic and terrestrial), molluscs, crustaceans, insects, fish and amphibians concluded that BPA have been shown to affect reproduction in all studied animal groups, to impair development in crustaceans and amphibians and to induce genetic aberrations.

A large 2010 study of two rivers in Canada found that areas contaminated with hormone-like chemicals including bisphenol A showed females made up 85 per cent of the population of a certain fish, while females made up only 55 per cent in uncontaminated areas.

BPA: Death by Plastic - Special Report - Sep 3, 2011
Aaron Dykes hosts a segment on Bisphenol A, the dangerous estrogenic in plastic drinking bottles and food containers. BPA is a known toxic substance outlawed in Canada and Europe, but still used in the United States, even though the FDA raised concerns regarding exposure of fetuses, infants and young children to the substance.

- Jun 28, 2011
Bisphenol-A (BPA), known as the "gender bending" chemical because of its connection to male impotence, has now been shown to decrease sperm mobility and quality.

The findings are likely to increase pressure on governments around the world to follow Canada and ban the substance from our shelves. BPA is used widely to make plastic harder and watertight tin cans.

It is found in most food and drink cans -- including tins of infant formula milk -- plastic food containers, and the casings of mobile phones, and other electronic goods.

Part 1 of 3

Part 2 of 3

Part 3 of 3

We're Poisoned! - FDA is killing us *Plastics* Bisphenol-A
This is an excerpt from Garbage Island documentary - Check it out:

Bisphenol A (BPA) Contaminating Our Food

Bisphenol A, Food Containers, Effects on Humans, Gov't Regs

ABC News Report on the Dangers of Bisphenol A

BPA in Plastic Bottles CNN Report
Bisphenol-A: The Poison in Plastic You Need To Know About

Bisphenol A: What are the effects?

Plastic bottles and BPA
BPA is just one of the chemicals found in plastic food containers that's been linked to a slew of health problems. It's tough to keep track of which plastics to avoid, so here are three easy ways to eliminate plastic containers altogether.

BPA - Bisphenol A


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